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A Forensic Engineer Gives Thanks

When I train a group of new engineers, I often begin by asking them to reach over their shoulders to give themselves a pat on the back. Why? For entering into a profession for which I believe they should be thankful.  I became an engineer because I always loved figuring things out, and during my long career, no other discipline has given me the satisfaction of almost constant problem solving. So for that, I’m thankful.

…no other discipline has given me the satisfaction of almost constant problem solving. So for that, I’m thankful.

I am likely one of only a few people who have ever considered mentioning entropy in my prayers of thanksgiving, but all forensic engineers owe their careers to this universal phenomena.  Entropy, also known as the Second Law of Thermodynamics, means that things fall apart and do not fall together. Thus we will never run out of problems to solve. So for that, I’m thankful.

I am thankful when the 10:12 pitch roof I saw on Google Street View is actually the house next door, and it turns out the roof I’ll be climbing is a 3:12 pitch.  I am thankful for a cool, dry crawlspace with no signs of snakes or dead animals.  I am thankful when my highway exit occurs just before the end of the traffic backup that extends beyond the horizon.  I am thankful for new employees who haven’t heard my stories yet,  and who will likely be a captive audience.

There are many random and trivial blessings I encounter each day as a forensic engineer, and I am thankful for them all.

 

View more gratitude from our professionals in this video.

Read other topics Russ has written on, including space heaters and condensation and winter.

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